Reading Practice Test

TABE Level E Reading Practice Test

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Question 1

Which word has a long a vowel sound?

A
Slack
B
Flaw
C
Bread
D
Grade
Question 1 Explanation: 
Answer choice (d) is correct because it expresses a long a vowel sound, which would sound like "ay." The other options are different variations of the a vowel sound, but none of them are long.
Question 2
Chump Change

(1) One of the easiest ways to track the passing of time is to just look at the prices of products on the shelves of your local grocery store. Every year, inflation drives up the prices of the things you regularly buy. It’s this very idea that inspired US Representative Jim Kolbe to introduce radical legislation in 2001. The legislation didn’t pass, but the debate remains. What was Kolbe’s radical idea? Get rid of the penny.

(2) Think about it. Imagine a penny sitting on the side of the road as you walk by. Is it even worth your trouble to pick it up? Most Americans wouldn’t take the time to pick up a penny off the street. If people don’t even think the penny is worth picking up off the ground, it clearly doesn’t hold much worth to them.


Figure 1: Survey taken of 350 Americans between 18 and 24. Each was asked, “Would you pick up a penny if you saw it on the sidewalk?”

(3) Those who would like to see the penny go the way of the half dollar argue that getting rid of pennies would save people time, save the government money, and get rid of clutter. A study done by the National Association of Convenience Stores estimated that pennies add an extra 2.5 seconds to each cash transaction (on average). That’s not a big number, but multiply it by the number of cash transactions a cashier sees each day, then multiply it by the number of cashiers at a store, then multiply it by the number of stores, and that number is considerably higher.

(4) Keeping the penny in circulation also costs the government money. According to one former Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Treasury Department, Aaron Klein, keeping the penny in circulation could cost the US Government almost $2 billion in losses over the next 30 years. That’s a lot of money for a little piece of copper that no one seems to value.

(5) Getting rid of the penny could have important consequences, though. The penny could be one of the things that keeps inflation from getting out of hand. Abolishing the penny might cause prices to soar even higher to account for the lack of a cent piece. Additionally, to accommodate people paying in cash, transactions would have to be rounded off to the nearest 5 cents, which could affect low-income families who rely on every penny to survive. Beyond that, most Americans don’t want to say goodbye to the penny yet. In a Harris Poll taken in 2004, only 23% of Americans surveyed favor abolishing the penny, with 59% of people opposing it. Without more opposition from American citizens, the penny may be here to stay, but for how long?
 

According to the article, which of these is one of the reasons people want to keep the penny?

A
Getting rid of the penny will cost the government a lot of money.
B
Getting rid of the penny will be a waste of time for a lot of cashiers.
C
Getting rid of the penny will cause inflation to increase more rapidly.
D
Getting rid of the penny could make us more reliant on digital transactions.
Question 2 Explanation: 
Answer choice (C) is correct because the author writes about inflation in the article, and how the penny may be keeping it from getting worse. Answer choices (A) and (B) are reasons to support abolishing the penny, while answer choice (D) is not represented in the article at all.
Question 3
Chump Change

(1) One of the easiest ways to track the passing of time is to just look at the prices of products on the shelves of your local grocery store. Every year, inflation drives up the prices of the things you regularly buy. It’s this very idea that inspired US Representative Jim Kolbe to introduce radical legislation in 2001. The legislation didn’t pass, but the debate remains. What was Kolbe’s radical idea? Get rid of the penny.

(2) Think about it. Imagine a penny sitting on the side of the road as you walk by. Is it even worth your trouble to pick it up? Most Americans wouldn’t take the time to pick up a penny off the street. If people don’t even think the penny is worth picking up off the ground, it clearly doesn’t hold much worth to them.


Figure 1: Survey taken of 350 Americans between 18 and 24. Each was asked, “Would you pick up a penny if you saw it on the sidewalk?”

(3) Those who would like to see the penny go the way of the half dollar argue that getting rid of pennies would save people time, save the government money, and get rid of clutter. A study done by the National Association of Convenience Stores estimated that pennies add an extra 2.5 seconds to each cash transaction (on average). That’s not a big number, but multiply it by the number of cash transactions a cashier sees each day, then multiply it by the number of cashiers at a store, then multiply it by the number of stores, and that number is considerably higher.

(4) Keeping the penny in circulation also costs the government money. According to one former Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Treasury Department, Aaron Klein, keeping the penny in circulation could cost the US Government almost $2 billion in losses over the next 30 years. That’s a lot of money for a little piece of copper that no one seems to value.

(5) Getting rid of the penny could have important consequences, though. The penny could be one of the things that keeps inflation from getting out of hand. Abolishing the penny might cause prices to soar even higher to account for the lack of a cent piece. Additionally, to accommodate people paying in cash, transactions would have to be rounded off to the nearest 5 cents, which could affect low-income families who rely on every penny to survive. Beyond that, most Americans don’t want to say goodbye to the penny yet. In a Harris Poll taken in 2004, only 23% of Americans surveyed favor abolishing the penny, with 59% of people opposing it. Without more opposition from American citizens, the penny may be here to stay, but for how long?
 

Read the sentence from the article.

Those who would like to see the penny go the way of the half dollar argue that getting rid of pennies would save people time, save the government money, and get rid of clutter.

In the context of the article, what does the phrase, “go the way of the half dollar” most nearly mean?

A
Be taken out of circulation
B
Still be used to this day
C
Hang around long after anyone wanted it anymore
D
Get replaced with a new design concept
Question 3 Explanation: 
Answer choice (A) is correct because the author is pointing out another coin which has been taken out of circulation, the half dollar. Half dollars are still made for collectors, but haven’t been minted for circulation since 1987. In context, it’s clear that the phrase has to have something to do with being removed, and answer choice (A) is the only one that fits that description.
Question 4
Chump Change

(1) One of the easiest ways to track the passing of time is to just look at the prices of products on the shelves of your local grocery store. Every year, inflation drives up the prices of the things you regularly buy. It’s this very idea that inspired US Representative Jim Kolbe to introduce radical legislation in 2001. The legislation didn’t pass, but the debate remains. What was Kolbe’s radical idea? Get rid of the penny.

(2) Think about it. Imagine a penny sitting on the side of the road as you walk by. Is it even worth your trouble to pick it up? Most Americans wouldn’t take the time to pick up a penny off the street. If people don’t even think the penny is worth picking up off the ground, it clearly doesn’t hold much worth to them.


Figure 1: Survey taken of 350 Americans between 18 and 24. Each was asked, “Would you pick up a penny if you saw it on the sidewalk?”

(3) Those who would like to see the penny go the way of the half dollar argue that getting rid of pennies would save people time, save the government money, and get rid of clutter. A study done by the National Association of Convenience Stores estimated that pennies add an extra 2.5 seconds to each cash transaction (on average). That’s not a big number, but multiply it by the number of cash transactions a cashier sees each day, then multiply it by the number of cashiers at a store, then multiply it by the number of stores, and that number is considerably higher.

(4) Keeping the penny in circulation also costs the government money. According to one former Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Treasury Department, Aaron Klein, keeping the penny in circulation could cost the US Government almost $2 billion in losses over the next 30 years. That’s a lot of money for a little piece of copper that no one seems to value.

(5) Getting rid of the penny could have important consequences, though. The penny could be one of the things that keeps inflation from getting out of hand. Abolishing the penny might cause prices to soar even higher to account for the lack of a cent piece. Additionally, to accommodate people paying in cash, transactions would have to be rounded off to the nearest 5 cents, which could affect low-income families who rely on every penny to survive. Beyond that, most Americans don’t want to say goodbye to the penny yet. In a Harris Poll taken in 2004, only 23% of Americans surveyed favor abolishing the penny, with 59% of people opposing it. Without more opposition from American citizens, the penny may be here to stay, but for how long?
 

Look at the pie chart in the article.

Which section of the pie chart most clearly supports the information in Paragraph 3 of the article?

A
The section of the chart marked “Would.”
B
The section of the chart marked “Wouldn’t.”
C
The section of the chart marked “not sure.”
D
The caption on the chart.
Question 4 Explanation: 
Answer choice (B) is correct because the author is asserting that most people wouldn’t pick up a penny if they saw it. According to the study, 82% of Americans age 18-24 “wouldn’t” pick it up, which directly supports the author’s assertion.
Question 5
Chump Change

(1) One of the easiest ways to track the passing of time is to just look at the prices of products on the shelves of your local grocery store. Every year, inflation drives up the prices of the things you regularly buy. It’s this very idea that inspired US Representative Jim Kolbe to introduce radical legislation in 2001. The legislation didn’t pass, but the debate remains. What was Kolbe’s radical idea? Get rid of the penny.

(2) Think about it. Imagine a penny sitting on the side of the road as you walk by. Is it even worth your trouble to pick it up? Most Americans wouldn’t take the time to pick up a penny off the street. If people don’t even think the penny is worth picking up off the ground, it clearly doesn’t hold much worth to them.


Figure 1: Survey taken of 350 Americans between 18 and 24. Each was asked, “Would you pick up a penny if you saw it on the sidewalk?”

(3) Those who would like to see the penny go the way of the half dollar argue that getting rid of pennies would save people time, save the government money, and get rid of clutter. A study done by the National Association of Convenience Stores estimated that pennies add an extra 2.5 seconds to each cash transaction (on average). That’s not a big number, but multiply it by the number of cash transactions a cashier sees each day, then multiply it by the number of cashiers at a store, then multiply it by the number of stores, and that number is considerably higher.

(4) Keeping the penny in circulation also costs the government money. According to one former Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Treasury Department, Aaron Klein, keeping the penny in circulation could cost the US Government almost $2 billion in losses over the next 30 years. That’s a lot of money for a little piece of copper that no one seems to value.

(5) Getting rid of the penny could have important consequences, though. The penny could be one of the things that keeps inflation from getting out of hand. Abolishing the penny might cause prices to soar even higher to account for the lack of a cent piece. Additionally, to accommodate people paying in cash, transactions would have to be rounded off to the nearest 5 cents, which could affect low-income families who rely on every penny to survive. Beyond that, most Americans don’t want to say goodbye to the penny yet. In a Harris Poll taken in 2004, only 23% of Americans surveyed favor abolishing the penny, with 59% of people opposing it. Without more opposition from American citizens, the penny may be here to stay, but for how long?
 

Part A

What is the main idea of the article?

A
There are legitimate reasons for getting rid of the penny, but until the majority of people support abolishing it, nothing is going to change.
B
Even though there are some good reasons to get rid of the penny, it’s important that we don’t get rid of it because we need it.
C
People who want to get rid of the penny aren’t thinking through all of the consequences.
D
The decision to keep the penny is politically motivated and financed by lobbyists for the copper industry.
Question 5 Explanation: 
Answer choice (A) is correct because it reflects the balanced discussion the author presented as well as her final conclusion. The other choices are directly refuted by the article.
Question 6
Chump Change

(1) One of the easiest ways to track the passing of time is to just look at the prices of products on the shelves of your local grocery store. Every year, inflation drives up the prices of the things you regularly buy. It’s this very idea that inspired US Representative Jim Kolbe to introduce radical legislation in 2001. The legislation didn’t pass, but the debate remains. What was Kolbe’s radical idea? Get rid of the penny.

(2) Think about it. Imagine a penny sitting on the side of the road as you walk by. Is it even worth your trouble to pick it up? Most Americans wouldn’t take the time to pick up a penny off the street. If people don’t even think the penny is worth picking up off the ground, it clearly doesn’t hold much worth to them.


Figure 1: Survey taken of 350 Americans between 18 and 24. Each was asked, “Would you pick up a penny if you saw it on the sidewalk?”

(3) Those who would like to see the penny go the way of the half dollar argue that getting rid of pennies would save people time, save the government money, and get rid of clutter. A study done by the National Association of Convenience Stores estimated that pennies add an extra 2.5 seconds to each cash transaction (on average). That’s not a big number, but multiply it by the number of cash transactions a cashier sees each day, then multiply it by the number of cashiers at a store, then multiply it by the number of stores, and that number is considerably higher.

(4) Keeping the penny in circulation also costs the government money. According to one former Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Treasury Department, Aaron Klein, keeping the penny in circulation could cost the US Government almost $2 billion in losses over the next 30 years. That’s a lot of money for a little piece of copper that no one seems to value.

(5) Getting rid of the penny could have important consequences, though. The penny could be one of the things that keeps inflation from getting out of hand. Abolishing the penny might cause prices to soar even higher to account for the lack of a cent piece. Additionally, to accommodate people paying in cash, transactions would have to be rounded off to the nearest 5 cents, which could affect low-income families who rely on every penny to survive. Beyond that, most Americans don’t want to say goodbye to the penny yet. In a Harris Poll taken in 2004, only 23% of Americans surveyed favor abolishing the penny, with 59% of people opposing it. Without more opposition from American citizens, the penny may be here to stay, but for how long?
 

Part B

Which TWO sentences support the answer to Part A?

A
“Keeping the penny in circulation also costs the government money.”
B
“The penny could be one of the things that keeps inflation from getting out of hand.”
C
“Additionally, to accommodate people paying in cash, transactions would have to be rounded off to the nearest 5 cents, which could disproportionately affect low-income families who rely on every penny to survive.”
D
“Without more opposition from American citizens, the penny may be here to stay, but for how long?”
E
“Imagine a penny sitting on the side of the road as you walk by.”
F
“It’s this very idea that inspired US Representative Jim Kolbe to introduce radical legislation in 2001.”
Question 6 Explanation: 
Only answer choices (A) and (D) support the answer from Part A. The other options either provide transitions and filler or are supportive of the opposite side of the argument (B).
Question 7
Chump Change

(1) One of the easiest ways to track the passing of time is to just look at the prices of products on the shelves of your local grocery store. Every year, inflation drives up the prices of the things you regularly buy. It’s this very idea that inspired US Representative Jim Kolbe to introduce radical legislation in 2001. The legislation didn’t pass, but the debate remains. What was Kolbe’s radical idea? Get rid of the penny.

(2) Think about it. Imagine a penny sitting on the side of the road as you walk by. Is it even worth your trouble to pick it up? Most Americans wouldn’t take the time to pick up a penny off the street. If people don’t even think the penny is worth picking up off the ground, it clearly doesn’t hold much worth to them.


Figure 1: Survey taken of 350 Americans between 18 and 24. Each was asked, “Would you pick up a penny if you saw it on the sidewalk?”

(3) Those who would like to see the penny go the way of the half dollar argue that getting rid of pennies would save people time, save the government money, and get rid of clutter. A study done by the National Association of Convenience Stores estimated that pennies add an extra 2.5 seconds to each cash transaction (on average). That’s not a big number, but multiply it by the number of cash transactions a cashier sees each day, then multiply it by the number of cashiers at a store, then multiply it by the number of stores, and that number is considerably higher.

(4) Keeping the penny in circulation also costs the government money. According to one former Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Treasury Department, Aaron Klein, keeping the penny in circulation could cost the US Government almost $2 billion in losses over the next 30 years. That’s a lot of money for a little piece of copper that no one seems to value.

(5) Getting rid of the penny could have important consequences, though. The penny could be one of the things that keeps inflation from getting out of hand. Abolishing the penny might cause prices to soar even higher to account for the lack of a cent piece. Additionally, to accommodate people paying in cash, transactions would have to be rounded off to the nearest 5 cents, which could affect low-income families who rely on every penny to survive. Beyond that, most Americans don’t want to say goodbye to the penny yet. In a Harris Poll taken in 2004, only 23% of Americans surveyed favor abolishing the penny, with 59% of people opposing it. Without more opposition from American citizens, the penny may be here to stay, but for how long?
 

Read the sentence from the article.

Additionally, to accommodate people paying in cash, transactions would have to be rounded off to the nearest 5 cents, which could affect low-income families who rely on every penny to survive.

Which of the following words could replace the word “accommodate” in the sentence above without changing the meaning?

A
Forgive
B
Delay
C
Stop
D
Help
Question 7 Explanation: 
Answer choice (D) is correct because rounding off sale totals would need to be done to make things easier for consumers. The only answer choice that has a word for “make things easier” is answer choice (D).
Question 8
Chump Change

(1) One of the easiest ways to track the passing of time is to just look at the prices of products on the shelves of your local grocery store. Every year, inflation drives up the prices of the things you regularly buy. It’s this very idea that inspired US Representative Jim Kolbe to introduce radical legislation in 2001. The legislation didn’t pass, but the debate remains. What was Kolbe’s radical idea? Get rid of the penny.

(2) Think about it. Imagine a penny sitting on the side of the road as you walk by. Is it even worth your trouble to pick it up? Most Americans wouldn’t take the time to pick up a penny off the street. If people don’t even think the penny is worth picking up off the ground, it clearly doesn’t hold much worth to them.


Figure 1: Survey taken of 350 Americans between 18 and 24. Each was asked, “Would you pick up a penny if you saw it on the sidewalk?”

(3) Those who would like to see the penny go the way of the half dollar argue that getting rid of pennies would save people time, save the government money, and get rid of clutter. A study done by the National Association of Convenience Stores estimated that pennies add an extra 2.5 seconds to each cash transaction (on average). That’s not a big number, but multiply it by the number of cash transactions a cashier sees each day, then multiply it by the number of cashiers at a store, then multiply it by the number of stores, and that number is considerably higher.

(4) Keeping the penny in circulation also costs the government money. According to one former Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Treasury Department, Aaron Klein, keeping the penny in circulation could cost the US Government almost $2 billion in losses over the next 30 years. That’s a lot of money for a little piece of copper that no one seems to value.

(5) Getting rid of the penny could have important consequences, though. The penny could be one of the things that keeps inflation from getting out of hand. Abolishing the penny might cause prices to soar even higher to account for the lack of a cent piece. Additionally, to accommodate people paying in cash, transactions would have to be rounded off to the nearest 5 cents, which could affect low-income families who rely on every penny to survive. Beyond that, most Americans don’t want to say goodbye to the penny yet. In a Harris Poll taken in 2004, only 23% of Americans surveyed favor abolishing the penny, with 59% of people opposing it. Without more opposition from American citizens, the penny may be here to stay, but for how long?
 

Which of the following best states the author’s opinion about the usefulness of the penny?

A
It is unclear how getting rid of the penny would affect the economy.
B
It is still a necessary part of our economy.
C
It’s not necessary anymore, but people like it.
D
The penny should have been abolished 20 years ago.
Question 8 Explanation: 
Answer choice (C) is correct because while the author doesn’t really take a stance on whether the penny should be abolished or not, she seems to believe that it won’t be abolished as long as people support it. While the article does support answer choice (B), it does not represent the author’s opinion as it is presented in the article. There is no evidence to support answer choices (A) and (D).
Question 9
Chump Change

(1) One of the easiest ways to track the passing of time is to just look at the prices of products on the shelves of your local grocery store. Every year, inflation drives up the prices of the things you regularly buy. It’s this very idea that inspired US Representative Jim Kolbe to introduce radical legislation in 2001. The legislation didn’t pass, but the debate remains. What was Kolbe’s radical idea? Get rid of the penny.

(2) Think about it. Imagine a penny sitting on the side of the road as you walk by. Is it even worth your trouble to pick it up? Most Americans wouldn’t take the time to pick up a penny off the street. If people don’t even think the penny is worth picking up off the ground, it clearly doesn’t hold much worth to them.


Figure 1: Survey taken of 350 Americans between 18 and 24. Each was asked, “Would you pick up a penny if you saw it on the sidewalk?”

(3) Those who would like to see the penny go the way of the half dollar argue that getting rid of pennies would save people time, save the government money, and get rid of clutter. A study done by the National Association of Convenience Stores estimated that pennies add an extra 2.5 seconds to each cash transaction (on average). That’s not a big number, but multiply it by the number of cash transactions a cashier sees each day, then multiply it by the number of cashiers at a store, then multiply it by the number of stores, and that number is considerably higher.

(4) Keeping the penny in circulation also costs the government money. According to one former Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Treasury Department, Aaron Klein, keeping the penny in circulation could cost the US Government almost $2 billion in losses over the next 30 years. That’s a lot of money for a little piece of copper that no one seems to value.

(5) Getting rid of the penny could have important consequences, though. The penny could be one of the things that keeps inflation from getting out of hand. Abolishing the penny might cause prices to soar even higher to account for the lack of a cent piece. Additionally, to accommodate people paying in cash, transactions would have to be rounded off to the nearest 5 cents, which could affect low-income families who rely on every penny to survive. Beyond that, most Americans don’t want to say goodbye to the penny yet. In a Harris Poll taken in 2004, only 23% of Americans surveyed favor abolishing the penny, with 59% of people opposing it. Without more opposition from American citizens, the penny may be here to stay, but for how long?
 

Based on the article, which of the following sentences would the author agree with?

A
The government is not strong enough to take away the penny and deal with the consequences.
B
If the government gets rid of the penny, there will be serious problems in our nation’s economy.
C
When most Americans agree that getting rid of the penny is a good idea, the government should get rid of it.
D
The penny is worthless and there would be no consequences if the government got rid of it.
Question 9 Explanation: 
Answer choice (C) is correct because the author concludes the article by saying that the penny is her to stay because most Americans like it. It would make sense, then, that the author would agree with answer choice (C). While the article mentions potential problems with getting rid of the penny, these problems aren’t necessarily serious (B). Answer choices (A) and (D) are directly refuted by the article.
Question 10
Chump Change

(1) One of the easiest ways to track the passing of time is to just look at the prices of products on the shelves of your local grocery store. Every year, inflation drives up the prices of the things you regularly buy. It’s this very idea that inspired US Representative Jim Kolbe to introduce radical legislation in 2001. The legislation didn’t pass, but the debate remains. What was Kolbe’s radical idea? Get rid of the penny.

(2) Think about it. Imagine a penny sitting on the side of the road as you walk by. Is it even worth your trouble to pick it up? Most Americans wouldn’t take the time to pick up a penny off the street. If people don’t even think the penny is worth picking up off the ground, it clearly doesn’t hold much worth to them.


Figure 1: Survey taken of 350 Americans between 18 and 24. Each was asked, “Would you pick up a penny if you saw it on the sidewalk?”

(3) Those who would like to see the penny go the way of the half dollar argue that getting rid of pennies would save people time, save the government money, and get rid of clutter. A study done by the National Association of Convenience Stores estimated that pennies add an extra 2.5 seconds to each cash transaction (on average). That’s not a big number, but multiply it by the number of cash transactions a cashier sees each day, then multiply it by the number of cashiers at a store, then multiply it by the number of stores, and that number is considerably higher.

(4) Keeping the penny in circulation also costs the government money. According to one former Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Treasury Department, Aaron Klein, keeping the penny in circulation could cost the US Government almost $2 billion in losses over the next 30 years. That’s a lot of money for a little piece of copper that no one seems to value.

(5) Getting rid of the penny could have important consequences, though. The penny could be one of the things that keeps inflation from getting out of hand. Abolishing the penny might cause prices to soar even higher to account for the lack of a cent piece. Additionally, to accommodate people paying in cash, transactions would have to be rounded off to the nearest 5 cents, which could affect low-income families who rely on every penny to survive. Beyond that, most Americans don’t want to say goodbye to the penny yet. In a Harris Poll taken in 2004, only 23% of Americans surveyed favor abolishing the penny, with 59% of people opposing it. Without more opposition from American citizens, the penny may be here to stay, but for how long?
 

If you break the word nonexistent into its parts, “non-” represents which of the following parts of a word?

A
Synonym
B
Root word
C
Suffix
D
Prefix
Question 10 Explanation: 
Answer choice (D) is correct because “non-” is at the beginning of the word. A prefix comes at the beginning of the word and helps to give it meaning. “Non” means “not,” which means that the word “nonexistent” means “not existent.”
Question 11
Flytraps are From Venus

(1) There are lots of plants for you to see when you play outside. Trees are plants, flowers are plants, and even grass is a plant. When we think of plants, these are the types of things we think about. Animals have mouths that eat, but plants get their food from the sunlight. But can you imagine what it would look like if a plant had a mouth like animals do? There’s no need to imagine because there is one plant with a mouth, and it’s called the Venus flytrap.

(2) Unlike most plants, the Venus flytrap is carnivorous, which means it eats meat. It doesn’t eat burgers and chicken like humans do, instead it eats flies and other insects. The Venus flytrap was named after the Roman goddess of love Venus, for the way it lures its prey into its mouth before eating it. The plant sits still waiting for its food to come along. When an insect, unaware of the type of plant it has landed on, climbs into the mouth of the Venus flytrap, it’s dinner time!

(3) The Venus flytrap has small hairs on its “mouth” that are sensitive to the touch. When pressure is applied to these hairs, the “mouth” snaps shut around the plant’s prey. This kind of quick movement is not very common in plants. If the insect is too stuck to get out and get away, the mouth seals itself and becomes a sort of stomach that digests the insect.

(4) The Venus flytrap’s “mouth” is very sophisticated. The hairs that are designed to sense when an insect has fallen into the trap, are also designed to tell the different between an insect and something smaller, like dust or pollen. The “mouth” of the Venus flytrap only snaps shut if two or more of the pressure-sensitive hairs are triggered. This keeps the “mouth” from shutting every time a piece of dirt touches it and makes the plant more effective at catching insects.

(5) The Venus flytrap is a pretty rare plant, so don’t expect to see it in the woods behind the school. Venus flytraps like wet, swampy areas, so they live near bogs. In the United States, they only naturally live in the coastal bogs of the Carolinas. Venus flytraps have also been successfully brought to other areas, but the Carolinas are their only naturally home in the United States. There’s no need to be afraid if you see one, though, just keep your hands away from their “mouths,” unless you want to be plant food.
 

Read the sentence from the article.

Venus flytraps like wet, marshland areas, so they live near bogs.

Based on the context of the article, what are bogs?

A
Deserts
B
Beaches
C
Swamps
D
Forests
Question 11 Explanation: 
Answer choice (C) is correct because the sentence says that Venus flytraps live near wet, marshland areas, which means they live near “swamps.” Answer choices (A) and (D) are not considered “wet areas,” although forests can be near water sources. Answer choice (B) might be tempting, but although beaches are often “wet,” they are not “marshland.”
Question 12
Flytraps are From Venus

(1) There are lots of plants for you to see when you play outside. Trees are plants, flowers are plants, and even grass is a plant. When we think of plants, these are the types of things we think about. Animals have mouths that eat, but plants get their food from the sunlight. But can you imagine what it would look like if a plant had a mouth like animals do? There’s no need to imagine because there is one plant with a mouth, and it’s called the Venus flytrap.

(2) Unlike most plants, the Venus flytrap is carnivorous, which means it eats meat. It doesn’t eat burgers and chicken like humans do, instead it eats flies and other insects. The Venus flytrap was named after the Roman goddess of love Venus, for the way it lures its prey into its mouth before eating it. The plant sits still waiting for its food to come along. When an insect, unaware of the type of plant it has landed on, climbs into the mouth of the Venus flytrap, it’s dinner time!

(3) The Venus flytrap has small hairs on its “mouth” that are sensitive to the touch. When pressure is applied to these hairs, the “mouth” snaps shut around the plant’s prey. This kind of quick movement is not very common in plants. If the insect is too stuck to get out and get away, the mouth seals itself and becomes a sort of stomach that digests the insect.

(4) The Venus flytrap’s “mouth” is very sophisticated. The hairs that are designed to sense when an insect has fallen into the trap, are also designed to tell the different between an insect and something smaller, like dust or pollen. The “mouth” of the Venus flytrap only snaps shut if two or more of the pressure-sensitive hairs are triggered. This keeps the “mouth” from shutting every time a piece of dirt touches it and makes the plant more effective at catching insects.

(5) The Venus flytrap is a pretty rare plant, so don’t expect to see it in the woods behind the school. Venus flytraps like wet, swampy areas, so they live near bogs. In the United States, they only naturally live in the coastal bogs of the Carolinas. Venus flytraps have also been successfully brought to other areas, but the Carolinas are their only naturally home in the United States. There’s no need to be afraid if you see one, though, just keep your hands away from their “mouths,” unless you want to be plant food.
 

Which of the following timelines shows the correct method with which a Venus flytrap traps its prey?

A
B
C
D
Question 12 Explanation: 
Answer choice (B) is correct because it represents the flytrap’s eating process most accurately. The plant is still to lure the insect in, senses the insect with pressure-sensitive hairs, snaps shut, and then seals around the insect to digest it.
Question 13
Flytraps are From Venus

(1) There are lots of plants for you to see when you play outside. Trees are plants, flowers are plants, and even grass is a plant. When we think of plants, these are the types of things we think about. Animals have mouths that eat, but plants get their food from the sunlight. But can you imagine what it would look like if a plant had a mouth like animals do? There’s no need to imagine because there is one plant with a mouth, and it’s called the Venus flytrap.

(2) Unlike most plants, the Venus flytrap is carnivorous, which means it eats meat. It doesn’t eat burgers and chicken like humans do, instead it eats flies and other insects. The Venus flytrap was named after the Roman goddess of love Venus, for the way it lures its prey into its mouth before eating it. The plant sits still waiting for its food to come along. When an insect, unaware of the type of plant it has landed on, climbs into the mouth of the Venus flytrap, it’s dinner time!

(3) The Venus flytrap has small hairs on its “mouth” that are sensitive to the touch. When pressure is applied to these hairs, the “mouth” snaps shut around the plant’s prey. This kind of quick movement is not very common in plants. If the insect is too stuck to get out and get away, the mouth seals itself and becomes a sort of stomach that digests the insect.

(4) The Venus flytrap’s “mouth” is very sophisticated. The hairs that are designed to sense when an insect has fallen into the trap, are also designed to tell the different between an insect and something smaller, like dust or pollen. The “mouth” of the Venus flytrap only snaps shut if two or more of the pressure-sensitive hairs are triggered. This keeps the “mouth” from shutting every time a piece of dirt touches it and makes the plant more effective at catching insects.

(5) The Venus flytrap is a pretty rare plant, so don’t expect to see it in the woods behind the school. Venus flytraps like wet, swampy areas, so they live near bogs. In the United States, they only naturally live in the coastal bogs of the Carolinas. Venus flytraps have also been successfully brought to other areas, but the Carolinas are their only naturally home in the United States. There’s no need to be afraid if you see one, though, just keep your hands away from their “mouths,” unless you want to be plant food.
 

What is the main purpose of the article?

A
To inform readers about the Venus flytrap and what makes it different than most plants.
B
To call readers to action to save the endangered Venus flytrap.
C
To convince people to visit the Carolinas in search of the Venus flytrap.
D
To inform readers about the different types of plants that exist in the United States.
Question 13 Explanation: 
Answer choice (A) is correct because the article begins by introducing a unique plant, then goes on to provide information about the Venus flytrap. Answer choice (D) might be tempting, but the author only writes about one kind of plant. There is no indication that these plants are endangered in the article (B), nor is there a call for people to visit the Carolinas (C).
Question 14
Flytraps are From Venus

(1) There are lots of plants for you to see when you play outside. Trees are plants, flowers are plants, and even grass is a plant. When we think of plants, these are the types of things we think about. Animals have mouths that eat, but plants get their food from the sunlight. But can you imagine what it would look like if a plant had a mouth like animals do? There’s no need to imagine because there is one plant with a mouth, and it’s called the Venus flytrap.

(2) Unlike most plants, the Venus flytrap is carnivorous, which means it eats meat. It doesn’t eat burgers and chicken like humans do, instead it eats flies and other insects. The Venus flytrap was named after the Roman goddess of love Venus, for the way it lures its prey into its mouth before eating it. The plant sits still waiting for its food to come along. When an insect, unaware of the type of plant it has landed on, climbs into the mouth of the Venus flytrap, it’s dinner time!

(3) The Venus flytrap has small hairs on its “mouth” that are sensitive to the touch. When pressure is applied to these hairs, the “mouth” snaps shut around the plant’s prey. This kind of quick movement is not very common in plants. If the insect is too stuck to get out and get away, the mouth seals itself and becomes a sort of stomach that digests the insect.

(4) The Venus flytrap’s “mouth” is very sophisticated. The hairs that are designed to sense when an insect has fallen into the trap, are also designed to tell the different between an insect and something smaller, like dust or pollen. The “mouth” of the Venus flytrap only snaps shut if two or more of the pressure-sensitive hairs are triggered. This keeps the “mouth” from shutting every time a piece of dirt touches it and makes the plant more effective at catching insects.

(5) The Venus flytrap is a pretty rare plant, so don’t expect to see it in the woods behind the school. Venus flytraps like wet, swampy areas, so they live near bogs. In the United States, they only naturally live in the coastal bogs of the Carolinas. Venus flytraps have also been successfully brought to other areas, but the Carolinas are their only naturally home in the United States. There’s no need to be afraid if you see one, though, just keep your hands away from their “mouths,” unless you want to be plant food.
 

According to the article, what is one of the main things that is rare about the Venus flytrap?

A
It has a brain.
B
It lives in swamps and bogs.
C
It is carnivorous.
D
It needs food to produce energy.
Question 14 Explanation: 
Answer choice (C) is correct because the author states that it is rare to find a carnivorous plant; plants usually get their nutrition through photosynthesis (sunlight and water are their food). This eliminates answer choice (D). Answer choices (A) and (B) are not supported by the article.
Question 15
Flytraps are From Venus

(1) There are lots of plants for you to see when you play outside. Trees are plants, flowers are plants, and even grass is a plant. When we think of plants, these are the types of things we think about. Animals have mouths that eat, but plants get their food from the sunlight. But can you imagine what it would look like if a plant had a mouth like animals do? There’s no need to imagine because there is one plant with a mouth, and it’s called the Venus flytrap.

(2) Unlike most plants, the Venus flytrap is carnivorous, which means it eats meat. It doesn’t eat burgers and chicken like humans do, instead it eats flies and other insects. The Venus flytrap was named after the Roman goddess of love Venus, for the way it lures its prey into its mouth before eating it. The plant sits still waiting for its food to come along. When an insect, unaware of the type of plant it has landed on, climbs into the mouth of the Venus flytrap, it’s dinner time!

(3) The Venus flytrap has small hairs on its “mouth” that are sensitive to the touch. When pressure is applied to these hairs, the “mouth” snaps shut around the plant’s prey. This kind of quick movement is not very common in plants. If the insect is too stuck to get out and get away, the mouth seals itself and becomes a sort of stomach that digests the insect.

(4) The Venus flytrap’s “mouth” is very sophisticated. The hairs that are designed to sense when an insect has fallen into the trap, are also designed to tell the different between an insect and something smaller, like dust or pollen. The “mouth” of the Venus flytrap only snaps shut if two or more of the pressure-sensitive hairs are triggered. This keeps the “mouth” from shutting every time a piece of dirt touches it and makes the plant more effective at catching insects.

(5) The Venus flytrap is a pretty rare plant, so don’t expect to see it in the woods behind the school. Venus flytraps like wet, swampy areas, so they live near bogs. In the United States, they only naturally live in the coastal bogs of the Carolinas. Venus flytraps have also been successfully brought to other areas, but the Carolinas are their only naturally home in the United States. There’s no need to be afraid if you see one, though, just keep your hands away from their “mouths,” unless you want to be plant food.
 

14. Read the sentence from the article.

When pressure is applied to these hairs, the “mouth” snaps shut around the plant’s prey.

In the context of the sentence, what does “prey” most nearly mean?

A
The way it hunts.
B
The food it eats.
C
A message to a supernatural being.
D
The mouth of the Venus flytrap.
Question 15 Explanation: 
In the article the author writes about how the flytrap eats insects, so “prey” is referring to insects that land in the flytrap’s mouth. While the sentence is describing the method of “hunting” the flytrap uses, the word “prey” is not referring to this method.
Question 16
Flytraps are From Venus

(1) There are lots of plants for you to see when you play outside. Trees are plants, flowers are plants, and even grass is a plant. When we think of plants, these are the types of things we think about. Animals have mouths that eat, but plants get their food from the sunlight. But can you imagine what it would look like if a plant had a mouth like animals do? There’s no need to imagine because there is one plant with a mouth, and it’s called the Venus flytrap.

(2) Unlike most plants, the Venus flytrap is carnivorous, which means it eats meat. It doesn’t eat burgers and chicken like humans do, instead it eats flies and other insects. The Venus flytrap was named after the Roman goddess of love Venus, for the way it lures its prey into its mouth before eating it. The plant sits still waiting for its food to come along. When an insect, unaware of the type of plant it has landed on, climbs into the mouth of the Venus flytrap, it’s dinner time!

(3) The Venus flytrap has small hairs on its “mouth” that are sensitive to the touch. When pressure is applied to these hairs, the “mouth” snaps shut around the plant’s prey. This kind of quick movement is not very common in plants. If the insect is too stuck to get out and get away, the mouth seals itself and becomes a sort of stomach that digests the insect.

(4) The Venus flytrap’s “mouth” is very sophisticated. The hairs that are designed to sense when an insect has fallen into the trap, are also designed to tell the different between an insect and something smaller, like dust or pollen. The “mouth” of the Venus flytrap only snaps shut if two or more of the pressure-sensitive hairs are triggered. This keeps the “mouth” from shutting every time a piece of dirt touches it and makes the plant more effective at catching insects.

(5) The Venus flytrap is a pretty rare plant, so don’t expect to see it in the woods behind the school. Venus flytraps like wet, swampy areas, so they live near bogs. In the United States, they only naturally live in the coastal bogs of the Carolinas. Venus flytraps have also been successfully brought to other areas, but the Carolinas are their only naturally home in the United States. There’s no need to be afraid if you see one, though, just keep your hands away from their “mouths,” unless you want to be plant food.
 

According to the article, how does the Venus flytrap know to snap its “mouth” shut around an insect?

A
Pressure-sensitive hairs in the “mouth” detect objects that are the size of insects.
B
The plant has a unique way of detecting insects before they even land in their mouths.
C
The plant has limited vision that helps it “see” what object is laying in its mouth.
D
The plant constantly opens and shuts, but only begins to digest an object if it is an insect.
Question 16 Explanation: 
Answer choice (A) is correct because the article describes how these “hairs” can tell the difference between insects and larger objects, like dust and dirt. None of the other options are supported by anything in the article.
Question 17

Which word has a long i vowel sound?

A
sit
B
bite
C
bin
D
bring
Question 17 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (B). A long vowel sound mimics the sound of its letter. Therefore, a long I would make an eye sound. The only word in the answer choices with an eye sound is “bite” (B).
Question 18

Which word has a short o vowel sound?

A
Soak
B
Stuck
C
Stack
D
Sock
Question 18 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (D). A short vowel sound does not mimic the sound of its letter. Therefore, a short o would be an o that does not make an oh sound. The only word in the answer choices with an o that doesn’t make an oh sound is “Sock” (D).
Question 19
Tornado Alert

(1) The United States of America experiences more tornadoes than any other country in the world, so it is important for Americans, especially those living in high-risk areas, to be able to identify the warning signs. A tornado can cause an enormous amount of damage and threaten the lives of anyone in its path. If people better understand how to recognize when a tornado is going to touch down, a lot of lives will be spared.

(2) It is first important to understand how and why a tornado is formed. There are specific weather patterns that bring about a tornado. Basically, a tornado forms when the air temperature is instable, often caused by warm and humid temperatures low near the ground and cooler temperatures higher in the air. Tornadoes also rely heavily on wind conditions. There needs to be a lot of wind shear, or changes in the direction of the wind, for a tornado to form. Once a tornado forms, it will touch ground for no more than 20 minutes, but a tornado can do a lot of damage even in only a few minutes.

(3) So, how do people prepare themselves for a potential tornado? It’s all about noticing the warning signs. One thing people can look for is any noticeable and sudden shifts in the clouds and the sky. When the sky darkens and takes on a greenish color, for example, it could signal an approaching tornado. Similarly, an approaching cloud of debris could be a sign of a potential tornado forming, as well as the appearance of a “wall” of clouds. Sometimes, instead of debris, hail will begin to fall. Additionally, many people have described an eerie silence and stillness preceding a tornado. This is a prime example of the cliched phrase, “the calm before the storm.”

(4) Educating yourself on the warning signs of tornadoes, especially if you live in an area that experiences them often, can give you the precious moments you need to find shelter from the destruction. Tornadoes still baffle meteorologists because they are so difficult to predict. Meteorologists have gotten very good at detecting potential tornado threats, but even their best efforts won’t give you a lot of time to prepare if a tornado is on its way. It’s best to be able to pick up on the signals yourself and be as prepared as possible for if/when a tornado hits near your home.

 

According to the passage, which of these is a potential warning sign of a tornado?

A
downpouring rain
B
lightning
C
loud, thunderous noises
D
a cloud of debris
Question 19 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (D). It is the only answer that is directly stated in the passage. The passage mentions precipitation, but it mentions hail, not rain (A). While tornadoes have been known to make loud, thunderous noises (C) and be accompanied by lightning (B), neither of them is mentioned in the passage.
Question 20
Tornado Alert

(1) The United States of America experiences more tornadoes than any other country in the world, so it is important for Americans, especially those living in high-risk areas, to be able to identify the warning signs. A tornado can cause an enormous amount of damage and threaten the lives of anyone in its path. If people better understand how to recognize when a tornado is going to touch down, a lot of lives will be spared.

(2) It is first important to understand how and why a tornado is formed. There are specific weather patterns that bring about a tornado. Basically, a tornado forms when the air temperature is instable, often caused by warm and humid temperatures low near the ground and cooler temperatures higher in the air. Tornadoes also rely heavily on wind conditions. There needs to be a lot of wind shear, or changes in the direction of the wind, for a tornado to form. Once a tornado forms, it will touch ground for no more than 20 minutes, but a tornado can do a lot of damage even in only a few minutes.

(3) So, how do people prepare themselves for a potential tornado? It’s all about noticing the warning signs. One thing people can look for is any noticeable and sudden shifts in the clouds and the sky. When the sky darkens and takes on a greenish color, for example, it could signal an approaching tornado. Similarly, an approaching cloud of debris could be a sign of a potential tornado forming, as well as the appearance of a “wall” of clouds. Sometimes, instead of debris, hail will begin to fall. Additionally, many people have described an eerie silence and stillness preceding a tornado. This is a prime example of the cliched phrase, “the calm before the storm.”

(4) Educating yourself on the warning signs of tornadoes, especially if you live in an area that experiences them often, can give you the precious moments you need to find shelter from the destruction. Tornadoes still baffle meteorologists because they are so difficult to predict. Meteorologists have gotten very good at detecting potential tornado threats, but even their best efforts won’t give you a lot of time to prepare if a tornado is on its way. It’s best to be able to pick up on the signals yourself and be as prepared as possible for if/when a tornado hits near your home.

 

Part A

What is the main idea of the article?

A
Tornadoes are dangerous
B
Knowing the warning signs of a tornado is important
C
More tornadoes happen in America than anywhere else
D
Meteorologists have difficulty predicting tornadoes
Question 20 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (B). All of the other answers are mentioned in the passage, but only (B) is the main focus.
Question 21
Tornado Alert

(1) The United States of America experiences more tornadoes than any other country in the world, so it is important for Americans, especially those living in high-risk areas, to be able to identify the warning signs. A tornado can cause an enormous amount of damage and threaten the lives of anyone in its path. If people better understand how to recognize when a tornado is going to touch down, a lot of lives will be spared.

(2) It is first important to understand how and why a tornado is formed. There are specific weather patterns that bring about a tornado. Basically, a tornado forms when the air temperature is instable, often caused by warm and humid temperatures low near the ground and cooler temperatures higher in the air. Tornadoes also rely heavily on wind conditions. There needs to be a lot of wind shear, or changes in the direction of the wind, for a tornado to form. Once a tornado forms, it will touch ground for no more than 20 minutes, but a tornado can do a lot of damage even in only a few minutes.

(3) So, how do people prepare themselves for a potential tornado? It’s all about noticing the warning signs. One thing people can look for is any noticeable and sudden shifts in the clouds and the sky. When the sky darkens and takes on a greenish color, for example, it could signal an approaching tornado. Similarly, an approaching cloud of debris could be a sign of a potential tornado forming, as well as the appearance of a “wall” of clouds. Sometimes, instead of debris, hail will begin to fall. Additionally, many people have described an eerie silence and stillness preceding a tornado. This is a prime example of the cliched phrase, “the calm before the storm.”

(4) Educating yourself on the warning signs of tornadoes, especially if you live in an area that experiences them often, can give you the precious moments you need to find shelter from the destruction. Tornadoes still baffle meteorologists because they are so difficult to predict. Meteorologists have gotten very good at detecting potential tornado threats, but even their best efforts won’t give you a lot of time to prepare if a tornado is on its way. It’s best to be able to pick up on the signals yourself and be as prepared as possible for if/when a tornado hits near your home.

 

Part B

Which TWO sentences support the answer to Part A?

A
“If people better understand how to recognize when a tornado is going to touch down, a lot of lives will be spared.”
B
“A tornado can cause an enormous amount of damage and threaten the lives of anyone in its path.”
C
“Sometimes, instead of debris, hail will begin to fall.”
D
“Tornadoes still baffle meteorologists in that they are so difficult to predict.”
E
“It’s best to be able to pick up on the signals yourself and be as prepared as possible for if/when a tornado hits near your home.”
F
“This is a prime example of the cliched phrase, ‘the calm before the storm.’”
Question 21 Explanation: 
The correct answers are (A) and (E). The writer concludes the first paragraph by writing, “If people better understand how to recognize when a tornado is going to touch down, a lot of lives will be spared.” This is the thesis of the passage, as it is supported throughout. The main idea is reiterated at the end of the passage when the writer writes, “It’s best to be able to pick up on the signals yourself and be as prepared as possible for if/when a tornado hits near your home.” The other answers are related to the main idea, but don’t directly support it.
Question 22
Tornado Alert

(1) The United States of America experiences more tornadoes than any other country in the world, so it is important for Americans, especially those living in high-risk areas, to be able to identify the warning signs. A tornado can cause an enormous amount of damage and threaten the lives of anyone in its path. If people better understand how to recognize when a tornado is going to touch down, a lot of lives will be spared.

(2) It is first important to understand how and why a tornado is formed. There are specific weather patterns that bring about a tornado. Basically, a tornado forms when the air temperature is instable, often caused by warm and humid temperatures low near the ground and cooler temperatures higher in the air. Tornadoes also rely heavily on wind conditions. There needs to be a lot of wind shear, or changes in the direction of the wind, for a tornado to form. Once a tornado forms, it will touch ground for no more than 20 minutes, but a tornado can do a lot of damage even in only a few minutes.

(3) So, how do people prepare themselves for a potential tornado? It’s all about noticing the warning signs. One thing people can look for is any noticeable and sudden shifts in the clouds and the sky. When the sky darkens and takes on a greenish color, for example, it could signal an approaching tornado. Similarly, an approaching cloud of debris could be a sign of a potential tornado forming, as well as the appearance of a “wall” of clouds. Sometimes, instead of debris, hail will begin to fall. Additionally, many people have described an eerie silence and stillness preceding a tornado. This is a prime example of the cliched phrase, “the calm before the storm.”

(4) Educating yourself on the warning signs of tornadoes, especially if you live in an area that experiences them often, can give you the precious moments you need to find shelter from the destruction. Tornadoes still baffle meteorologists because they are so difficult to predict. Meteorologists have gotten very good at detecting potential tornado threats, but even their best efforts won’t give you a lot of time to prepare if a tornado is on its way. It’s best to be able to pick up on the signals yourself and be as prepared as possible for if/when a tornado hits near your home.

 

Read this sentence from the article.

When the sky darkens and takes on a greenish color, for example, it could signal an approaching tornado.

Which of the following is another way of saying approaching in this sentence?

A
going past
B
causing destruction
C
on its way
D
unavoidable
Question 22 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (C). This sentence follows a topic sentence describing ways for people to know that a tornado is on its way. Therefore, “going past” (A) does not exactly work. The tornado might be “causing destruction” (B), but that is not described by the word “approaching.” Answer choice (D) is tempting, but the passage is mainly about figuring out how to avoid a tornado, so answer choice (D) wouldn’t really make sense.
Question 23
Tornado Alert

(1) The United States of America experiences more tornadoes than any other country in the world, so it is important for Americans, especially those living in high-risk areas, to be able to identify the warning signs. A tornado can cause an enormous amount of damage and threaten the lives of anyone in its path. If people better understand how to recognize when a tornado is going to touch down, a lot of lives will be spared.

(2) It is first important to understand how and why a tornado is formed. There are specific weather patterns that bring about a tornado. Basically, a tornado forms when the air temperature is instable, often caused by warm and humid temperatures low near the ground and cooler temperatures higher in the air. Tornadoes also rely heavily on wind conditions. There needs to be a lot of wind shear, or changes in the direction of the wind, for a tornado to form. Once a tornado forms, it will touch ground for no more than 20 minutes, but a tornado can do a lot of damage even in only a few minutes.

(3) So, how do people prepare themselves for a potential tornado? It’s all about noticing the warning signs. One thing people can look for is any noticeable and sudden shifts in the clouds and the sky. When the sky darkens and takes on a greenish color, for example, it could signal an approaching tornado. Similarly, an approaching cloud of debris could be a sign of a potential tornado forming, as well as the appearance of a “wall” of clouds. Sometimes, instead of debris, hail will begin to fall. Additionally, many people have described an eerie silence and stillness preceding a tornado. This is a prime example of the cliched phrase, “the calm before the storm.”

(4) Educating yourself on the warning signs of tornadoes, especially if you live in an area that experiences them often, can give you the precious moments you need to find shelter from the destruction. Tornadoes still baffle meteorologists because they are so difficult to predict. Meteorologists have gotten very good at detecting potential tornado threats, but even their best efforts won’t give you a lot of time to prepare if a tornado is on its way. It’s best to be able to pick up on the signals yourself and be as prepared as possible for if/when a tornado hits near your home.

 

According to the passage, what two factors play a large role in the formation of tornadoes?

A
Clouds and the sky
B
Precipitation and temperature
C
Wind shear and air instability
D
Time of day and wind shear
Question 23 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (C). While other factors may contribute to the formation of tornadoes, the only two factors that the passage directly discusses are wind shear and air instability.
Question 24
Tornado Alert

(1) The United States of America experiences more tornadoes than any other country in the world, so it is important for Americans, especially those living in high-risk areas, to be able to identify the warning signs. A tornado can cause an enormous amount of damage and threaten the lives of anyone in its path. If people better understand how to recognize when a tornado is going to touch down, a lot of lives will be spared.

(2) It is first important to understand how and why a tornado is formed. There are specific weather patterns that bring about a tornado. Basically, a tornado forms when the air temperature is instable, often caused by warm and humid temperatures low near the ground and cooler temperatures higher in the air. Tornadoes also rely heavily on wind conditions. There needs to be a lot of wind shear, or changes in the direction of the wind, for a tornado to form. Once a tornado forms, it will touch ground for no more than 20 minutes, but a tornado can do a lot of damage even in only a few minutes.

(3) So, how do people prepare themselves for a potential tornado? It’s all about noticing the warning signs. One thing people can look for is any noticeable and sudden shifts in the clouds and the sky. When the sky darkens and takes on a greenish color, for example, it could signal an approaching tornado. Similarly, an approaching cloud of debris could be a sign of a potential tornado forming, as well as the appearance of a “wall” of clouds. Sometimes, instead of debris, hail will begin to fall. Additionally, many people have described an eerie silence and stillness preceding a tornado. This is a prime example of the cliched phrase, “the calm before the storm.”

(4) Educating yourself on the warning signs of tornadoes, especially if you live in an area that experiences them often, can give you the precious moments you need to find shelter from the destruction. Tornadoes still baffle meteorologists because they are so difficult to predict. Meteorologists have gotten very good at detecting potential tornado threats, but even their best efforts won’t give you a lot of time to prepare if a tornado is on its way. It’s best to be able to pick up on the signals yourself and be as prepared as possible for if/when a tornado hits near your home.

 

According to the passage, why do tornadoes still baffle meteorologists?

A
They are difficult to predict
B
No one knows what causes them
C
They cause so little destruction
D
No one has ever seen one
Question 24 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (A). The answer is directly stated in the sentence, “Tornadoes still baffle meteorologists because they are so difficult to predict.” All of the other answer choices are directly refuted by the passage.
Question 25
Tornado Alert

(1) The United States of America experiences more tornadoes than any other country in the world, so it is important for Americans, especially those living in high-risk areas, to be able to identify the warning signs. A tornado can cause an enormous amount of damage and threaten the lives of anyone in its path. If people better understand how to recognize when a tornado is going to touch down, a lot of lives will be spared.

(2) It is first important to understand how and why a tornado is formed. There are specific weather patterns that bring about a tornado. Basically, a tornado forms when the air temperature is instable, often caused by warm and humid temperatures low near the ground and cooler temperatures higher in the air. Tornadoes also rely heavily on wind conditions. There needs to be a lot of wind shear, or changes in the direction of the wind, for a tornado to form. Once a tornado forms, it will touch ground for no more than 20 minutes, but a tornado can do a lot of damage even in only a few minutes.

(3) So, how do people prepare themselves for a potential tornado? It’s all about noticing the warning signs. One thing people can look for is any noticeable and sudden shifts in the clouds and the sky. When the sky darkens and takes on a greenish color, for example, it could signal an approaching tornado. Similarly, an approaching cloud of debris could be a sign of a potential tornado forming, as well as the appearance of a “wall” of clouds. Sometimes, instead of debris, hail will begin to fall. Additionally, many people have described an eerie silence and stillness preceding a tornado. This is a prime example of the cliched phrase, “the calm before the storm.”

(4) Educating yourself on the warning signs of tornadoes, especially if you live in an area that experiences them often, can give you the precious moments you need to find shelter from the destruction. Tornadoes still baffle meteorologists because they are so difficult to predict. Meteorologists have gotten very good at detecting potential tornado threats, but even their best efforts won’t give you a lot of time to prepare if a tornado is on its way. It’s best to be able to pick up on the signals yourself and be as prepared as possible for if/when a tornado hits near your home.

 

Which of the following answers is the most accurate estimate for how long tornadoes last once they have made contact with the ground, according to the passage?

A
1 hour
B
More than 20 minutes
C
Fewer than 20 minutes
D
1-2 minutes
Question 25 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (C). This answer is provided directly in the sentence, “Once a tornado forms, it will touch ground for no more than 20 minutes, but a tornado can do a lot of damage even in only a few minutes.” A tornado may last only 1-2 minutes (D), but answer choice (C) is a more accurate answer because there is no indication that tornadoes are typically on the ground for such a small amount of time.
Question 26
Tornado Alert

(1) The United States of America experiences more tornadoes than any other country in the world, so it is important for Americans, especially those living in high-risk areas, to be able to identify the warning signs. A tornado can cause an enormous amount of damage and threaten the lives of anyone in its path. If people better understand how to recognize when a tornado is going to touch down, a lot of lives will be spared.

(2) It is first important to understand how and why a tornado is formed. There are specific weather patterns that bring about a tornado. Basically, a tornado forms when the air temperature is instable, often caused by warm and humid temperatures low near the ground and cooler temperatures higher in the air. Tornadoes also rely heavily on wind conditions. There needs to be a lot of wind shear, or changes in the direction of the wind, for a tornado to form. Once a tornado forms, it will touch ground for no more than 20 minutes, but a tornado can do a lot of damage even in only a few minutes.

(3) So, how do people prepare themselves for a potential tornado? It’s all about noticing the warning signs. One thing people can look for is any noticeable and sudden shifts in the clouds and the sky. When the sky darkens and takes on a greenish color, for example, it could signal an approaching tornado. Similarly, an approaching cloud of debris could be a sign of a potential tornado forming, as well as the appearance of a “wall” of clouds. Sometimes, instead of debris, hail will begin to fall. Additionally, many people have described an eerie silence and stillness preceding a tornado. This is a prime example of the cliched phrase, “the calm before the storm.”

(4) Educating yourself on the warning signs of tornadoes, especially if you live in an area that experiences them often, can give you the precious moments you need to find shelter from the destruction. Tornadoes still baffle meteorologists because they are so difficult to predict. Meteorologists have gotten very good at detecting potential tornado threats, but even their best efforts won’t give you a lot of time to prepare if a tornado is on its way. It’s best to be able to pick up on the signals yourself and be as prepared as possible for if/when a tornado hits near your home.

 

According to the bar graph, which state has averaged the most tornadoes?

A
Nebraska
B
Kansas
C
Illinois
D
Texas
Question 26 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (D). If you look at the chart, Texas’ bar is significantly longer than the other states at just over 150.
Question 27
Tornado Alert

(1) The United States of America experiences more tornadoes than any other country in the world, so it is important for Americans, especially those living in high-risk areas, to be able to identify the warning signs. A tornado can cause an enormous amount of damage and threaten the lives of anyone in its path. If people better understand how to recognize when a tornado is going to touch down, a lot of lives will be spared.

(2) It is first important to understand how and why a tornado is formed. There are specific weather patterns that bring about a tornado. Basically, a tornado forms when the air temperature is instable, often caused by warm and humid temperatures low near the ground and cooler temperatures higher in the air. Tornadoes also rely heavily on wind conditions. There needs to be a lot of wind shear, or changes in the direction of the wind, for a tornado to form. Once a tornado forms, it will touch ground for no more than 20 minutes, but a tornado can do a lot of damage even in only a few minutes.

(3) So, how do people prepare themselves for a potential tornado? It’s all about noticing the warning signs. One thing people can look for is any noticeable and sudden shifts in the clouds and the sky. When the sky darkens and takes on a greenish color, for example, it could signal an approaching tornado. Similarly, an approaching cloud of debris could be a sign of a potential tornado forming, as well as the appearance of a “wall” of clouds. Sometimes, instead of debris, hail will begin to fall. Additionally, many people have described an eerie silence and stillness preceding a tornado. This is a prime example of the cliched phrase, “the calm before the storm.”

(4) Educating yourself on the warning signs of tornadoes, especially if you live in an area that experiences them often, can give you the precious moments you need to find shelter from the destruction. Tornadoes still baffle meteorologists because they are so difficult to predict. Meteorologists have gotten very good at detecting potential tornado threats, but even their best efforts won’t give you a lot of time to prepare if a tornado is on its way. It’s best to be able to pick up on the signals yourself and be as prepared as possible for if/when a tornado hits near your home.

 

According to the bar graph, which of the following is the closest to the average number of tornadoes in Illinois between 1990 and 2010?

A
55
B
45
C
35
D
25
Question 27 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (A). If you look closely at the chart, you can see that Illinois’ bar reaches just past 50, which means the state averaged more than 50 tornadoes during the study. Answer choice (A) is the only answer that is over 50.
Question 28

Which word has a short e vowel sound?

A
peg
B
need
C
eat
D
we
Question 28 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (A). A short vowel sound does not mimic the sound of its letter. Therefore, a short e would be an e that does not make an "ee" sound. The only word in the answer choices that doesn’t make an "ee" sound is “peg” (A).
Question 29

Which word has a long u vowel sound?

A
Move
B
Mundane
C
Mutt
D
Mule
Question 29 Explanation: 
The correct answer is answer choice (D). A long vowel sound mimics the sound of its letter. Therefore, a long u would make a yoo sound. The only word in the answer choices with a yoo sound is “Mule” (D).
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